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Images of Research 2017 Voting

 Innovation and Entrepreneurship

<span class=bigheading><b>More than just a garden</b> by Tracy Morse </span><br />At Mfera Secondary School (Malawi), research in sustainable living practices has developed a flourishing garden from the dust. Employing water resource management and crop diversification principles, the garden has over 30 food and medicinal plants. It feeds the students, improving their nutrition, but also teaches them entrepreneurship, providing surplus that can be sold. These life-transforming practices are being adopted further afield, creating a lasting impact on Malawi’s poorest communities.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Tracy Morse</span>.  <span class=small>Collaborators: Dr Tara Beattie </span>
More than just a garden
Tracy Morse

At Mfera Secondary School (Malawi), research in sustainable living practices has developed a flourishing garden from the dust. Employing water resource management and crop diversification principles, the garden has over 30 food and medicinal plants. It feeds the students, improving their nutrition, but also teaches them entrepreneurship, providing surplus that can be sold. These life-transforming practices are being adopted further afield, creating a lasting impact on Malawi’s poorest communities.
Image: © 2017 Tracy Morse.  Collaborators: Dr Tara Beattie

 Advanced Manufacturing and Materials

<span class=bigheading><b>Colours of drug polymorphism</b> by Monika Warzecha </span><br /> 
This image shows crystals of olanzapine – a drug used to treat bipolar disease, which affects more than 50 million people worldwide. During crystallization, molecules can arrange themselves in different forms. The speed at which these ‘polymorphic’ forms dissolve varies dramatically, impacting the body’s ability to absorb the drug and stabilize the patient. Our research focuses on developing robust methods to control polymorphism, ensuring the drugs can do their job effectively.
 <br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Monika Warzecha</span>
Colours of drug polymorphism
Monika Warzecha

  This image shows crystals of olanzapine – a drug used to treat bipolar disease, which affects more than 50 million people worldwide. During crystallization, molecules can arrange themselves in different forms. The speed at which these ‘polymorphic’ forms dissolve varies dramatically, impacting the body’s ability to absorb the drug and stabilize the patient. Our research focuses on developing robust methods to control polymorphism, ensuring the drugs can do their job effectively.  
Image: © 2017 Monika Warzecha

 Society and Policy

<span class=bigheading><b>Social media and you</b> by Petya Eckler </span><br />How does Facebook make you feel about yourself? Our research shows that the more time young women spend on Facebook, the more they compare themselves to others and feel negatively about their own bodies; in some cases it can also lead to dysfunctional eating behaviours. By alerting these young women to the subtle ways in which social media affects them, we can hopefully protect them from its negative effects.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Petya Eckler</span>.  <span class=small>Collaborators: Deyan Stoev</span>
Social media and you
Petya Eckler

How does Facebook make you feel about yourself? Our research shows that the more time young women spend on Facebook, the more they compare themselves to others and feel negatively about their own bodies; in some cases it can also lead to dysfunctional eating behaviours. By alerting these young women to the subtle ways in which social media affects them, we can hopefully protect them from its negative effects.
Image: © 2017 Petya Eckler.  Collaborators: Deyan Stoev

 Ocean, Air & Space

<span class=bigheading><b>Monitoring under the watchful saint</b> by Samuel Grainger </span><br />
A mural of St Mungo watches over one of Glasgow’s many Air Pollution Monitoring Stations. When Nitrogen Dioxide (an urban pollutant) is exposed to a chemical fabric within the tubes, it forms crystals which are analysed to measure pollution levels. Our research trials a new type of tube which may improve readings by preventing strong winds from agitating the crystals, while maintaining the tubes’ ability to trap pollutants successfully.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Samuel Grainger</span>.  <span class=small>Collaborators: Sam Bates "Smug" (Mural Painter), Nicola Massey and Fiona Sutherland (Co-workers)</span>
Monitoring under the watchful saint
Samuel Grainger

A mural of St Mungo watches over one of Glasgow’s many Air Pollution Monitoring Stations. When Nitrogen Dioxide (an urban pollutant) is exposed to a chemical fabric within the tubes, it forms crystals which are analysed to measure pollution levels. Our research trials a new type of tube which may improve readings by preventing strong winds from agitating the crystals, while maintaining the tubes’ ability to trap pollutants successfully.
Image: © 2017 Samuel Grainger.  Collaborators: Sam Bates "Smug" (Mural Painter), Nicola Massey and Fiona Sutherland (Co-workers)

 Health & Wellbeing

<span class=bigheading><b>Inner Sorrow, Outer Smile</b> by Laura Del Carpio </span><br />
Sometimes your face doesn’t mirror what you’re feeling inside. In Scotland, two people die by suicide every day, but what happens to those left behind? Our research asks whether adolescents whose loved ones die by suicide are more likely to self-harm or consider suicide, compared with those affected by other causes of death. Answering this question will improve our understanding of suicide bereavement, and help inform prevention strategies and policies.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Laura Del Carpio</span>
Inner Sorrow, Outer Smile
Laura Del Carpio

Sometimes your face doesn’t mirror what you’re feeling inside. In Scotland, two people die by suicide every day, but what happens to those left behind? Our research asks whether adolescents whose loved ones die by suicide are more likely to self-harm or consider suicide, compared with those affected by other causes of death. Answering this question will improve our understanding of suicide bereavement, and help inform prevention strategies and policies.
Image: © 2017 Laura Del Carpio

 Measurement Science and Enabling Technologies

<span class=bigheading><b>Hidden water paths of plants</b> by Roberta Dainese </span><br />Soil erosion and landslides can cause serious damage and endanger lives. Our research is investigating ways of engineering certain plants to effectively stabilise slopes in a low carbon, sustainable way. This image – created using a neutron beam - reveals vital information about water uptake, and its progression through plant branches, helping us to understand the interactions between soil and vegetation, which is the first step to achieving this goal.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Roberta Dainese</span>.  <span class=small>Collaborators: alessandro tengattini, image processing</span>
Hidden water paths of plants
Roberta Dainese

Soil erosion and landslides can cause serious damage and endanger lives. Our research is investigating ways of engineering certain plants to effectively stabilise slopes in a low carbon, sustainable way. This image – created using a neutron beam - reveals vital information about water uptake, and its progression through plant branches, helping us to understand the interactions between soil and vegetation, which is the first step to achieving this goal.
Image: © 2017 Roberta Dainese.  Collaborators: alessandro tengattini, image processing

 Energy

<span class=bigheading><b>Powering business, fuelling change</b> by Aran Eales </span><br />Mobiles, computers, the internet…in the increasingly connected world we live in it’s easy to forget that many rural areas of Africa are not even connected to the electricity grid. However, cheaper and more available solar panels are now bringing power to remote businesses like this barber shop in Malawi. Our Energy for Development research group designs business models for innovative uses of energy, stimulating local economies and reducing poverty.<br /><span class=small>Image: © 2017 Aran Eales</span>
Powering business, fuelling change
Aran Eales

Mobiles, computers, the internet…in the increasingly connected world we live in it’s easy to forget that many rural areas of Africa are not even connected to the electricity grid. However, cheaper and more available solar panels are now bringing power to remote businesses like this barber shop in Malawi. Our Energy for Development research group designs business models for innovative uses of energy, stimulating local economies and reducing poverty.
Image: © 2017 Aran Eales